Fishing guides, anglers, tribes, and WDFW partner to restore Skykomish chum salmon

Eggs and milt are extracted from chum broodstock at WDFW’s Wallace River Hatchery near Sultan.
Angler Joey Pyburn holds up a female Skykomish chum salmon before transferring it to a holding pen.

Partnering to restore a run

One river where chum salmon were historically abundant is the Skykomish in Snohomish County, which flows out of Stevens Pass and the rain-soaked western foothills of the Cascade Mountains, joining with the Snoqualmie to form the Snohomish River.

WDFW hatchery staff process chum broodstock, including taking DNA samples and otoliths to help monitor the project’s success.

A model of collaboration

While more monitoring and scientific research is needed to determine exactly how effective the Skykomish broodstock program has been for restoring the river’s chum run, the effort has already been successful as a model of collaboration between local guides, anglers, tribes, and WDFW.

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The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is dedicated to preserving, protecting and perpetuating the state’s fish and wildlife resources.

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The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

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The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is dedicated to preserving, protecting and perpetuating the state’s fish and wildlife resources.