Why can’t more black bears be relocated following conflicts?

A black bear carrying a bag of garbage on Squak Mountain near Issaquah. Despite multiple warnings to area residents to secure their garbage and remove bird feeders, this bear became habituated to humans and continued getting into non-natural food sources, and had to be trapped and lethally removed in May 2022.

More information and tips are available at: wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/species/ursus-americanus#living as well as in this recent WDFW blog post.

A black bear attempts to open a compost bin. Using bear resistant containers and/or keeping garbage and compost bins inside a garage or shed until the morning of waste collection service are among the ways Washingtonians can reduce conflicts with black bears and other wildlife. Get more tips in this blog post.

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The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is dedicated to preserving, protecting and perpetuating the state’s fish and wildlife resources.